Dodge shows off updated electric charger at SEMA

Dodge first unveiled its electric muscle car, the Charger Daytona SRT Concept EV, in August with styling heavily inspired by the Charger Daytona of the late 1960s.

It also debuted some interesting new features for performance EVs, such as a multiple “shift point” transmission and a 126dB exhaust system that uses the firing order of a V8 engine that is “boosted with air pushed through a chambered exhaust system.” Not to mention a metric boatload of power, though that’s not all that new.

At the time, we didn’t know how much power Dodge put into the electric charger, but those details were confirmed at the SEMA show in Las Vegas.

Dodge has been developing the electric Charger Daytona SRT since its debut in August and not just in the new paint.

Delivered

Dodge has been developing the electric Charger Daytona SRT since its debut in August and not just in the new paint.

Dodge will offer the Daytona SRT in 400-volt and 800-volt variants, with the 400V models in 340kW, 370kW, 400kW, 440kW, 470kW and 500kW power levels.

READ MORE:
* Dodge’s electric charger has made its debut and we’ve become kids again
* Dodge Challenger and Charger stop with seven new specials
* Dodge to replace the V8 with a turbocharged six-cylinder?
* Farewell to the mighty Hellcat V8

These are divided into 340 and 440 versions, the figures come from their base power in kilowatts. Both can be upgraded with power packs called eStage 1 and 2, available as over-the-air purchases through Dodge’s Direct Connection arm.

Direct connection over-the-air power upgrades can unlock massive amounts of power.

Delivered

Direct connection over-the-air power upgrades can unlock massive amounts of power.

The most powerful version is called the SRT Banshee and uses the 800v subsystem mentioned earlier. Dodge doesn’t say exactly how much power it will pack, but we’d imagine it eclipsing the Charger SRT Hellcat Redeye’s 594 kW. No performance claims have been made for any power, but expect the 0-100km/h time to start with a two.

Banshee models will also receive Direct Connection upgrades, and all Stage 1 and 2 upgraded models will receive a special “crystal” key to unlock the extra power. At least one version will get four-wheel drive, as evidenced by the four-wheel burnout in one of the teaser images.

The SEMA show car came in a new Stryker Red livery, new ‘Stage 2’ badging on the body and interior, and 18-inch carbon fiber wheels wrapped with 305mm skid rubber. Dodge also uses the show to get feedback on the Fratzonic Chambered Exhaust to fine-tune the 126db system.

The most powerful Charger Daytona SRT gets an 800-volt electrical system, four-wheel drive and ridiculous power.

Delivered

The most powerful Charger Daytona SRT gets an 800-volt electrical system, four-wheel drive and ridiculous power.

Officially, the Charger Daytona SRT EV is still a concept, and while Dodge plans to produce it, we don’t know when that might be.

Interestingly, Dodge’s CEO has not ruled out putting the company’s new Hurricane inline-six in the next Charger, thanks to the modular nature of the STLA Large platform.

Boss Tim Kuniskis told The Drive at SEMA: “The STLA Large Car Platform is a multi-energy platform. It has the ability to run an ICE motor… I can take the bottom plate out. I can take the battery out I can put a drive shaft tunnel there. The platform is made to do that. It’s modular.”

Interestingly, there is still a chance that the next-generation charger will gain combustion power.  It's narrow, but it's there.

Delivered

Interestingly, there is still a chance that the next-generation charger will gain combustion power. It’s narrow, but it’s there.

Though tempting as that sounds, he was quick to add that just because he can do all of that doesn’t mean he will. “We certainly don’t start with something like that. We are launching a fully electric battery.”

It’s pretty clear that sooner or later Dodge wants to go electric and keep the Hurricane engine as a spare. At least, while the emissions regulations let the hurricane live.

And as for the last of Dodge’s V8-powered send-off specials, the most powerful of the seven was meant to debut at SEMA as well. Unfortunately, the engines continued to explode during development, causing the unveiling to take place sometime before the end of the year. Kuniskis told The Detroit Bureau that the engines literally exploded in the test lab, promising that “it will be a funny story later.”

Leave a Comment