Would You Go Big In This 1970 Cadillac Wagon For $38,995?

Nice price or no die Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon from 1970

Because it’s not a factory job today Nice price or no dice Caddy could easily have looked more Fisher-Price than Fisher Bodied, but instead, it tops it all off. Let’s see if we can also find a buyer.

It’s been a big week for polarizing prices and exaggerated results on NPOND. Whether it was outrageous modifications, questionable engine swaps or special luxury sedans with a tuner, this week’s vote somehow gone to extremes. The one from yesterday BMW M5 from 2000 turned out to be no different. That car is offered with a ton of miles under its belt and a $13,500 price tag that, though claimed to be the cheapest around, wasn’t cheap enough to avoid 88 percent of you give it is a loss without dice.

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Since this has been a week of extremes, let’s end it with one of the most extreme old-school luxury wagons you could find this custom 1970 Cadillac Fleetwood from ASC. I mean, if you’re looking for a car to make grandiose statement, surely it will scream.

As we all know, when this Fleetwood was new, Cadillac just didn’t build station wagons. No, this is the work of the American Sunroof Company, which still operates as American Specialty Cars. ASC offered sunroof conversions for popular luxury cars at the time, and in fact did a brief run for Cadillac in 1969 before the automaker adopted the option internally.

This wagon conversion involved a lot more work than just cutting a hole in the roof of the car, but thanks to the availability of similar models from other GM brands at the time, it still looks like a factory job. ASC made a handful of them over the course of a few years, all commissioned, and one ’71 issue even went to stuntman Evel Knilevel. It was yellow.

Image for article titled For $38,995, Would You Go Big in This 1970 Custom Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon?

The ad gives no history of this 1970 conversion, but does provide plenty of photos and a brief description:

This 1970 Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon for sale has a 472c.i. Numbers matching V8 with 4bbl Carb, Turbo 400 automatic transmission, converted to a wagon by ASC Custom Craft, very few of these wagons were ever produced, said to have 72,904 ORIGINAL miles! Correct Condor Blue exterior with vinyl roof, correct and original blue leather interior, power sunroof, power rear window, rear-facing third row seats, all rear seats fold down, factory A/C converted to R134a, power steering, power disc brakes, power seat, power door locks, AM radio, tilt wheel, rear seat footrests, very rare ASC built Cadillac Wagon that turns heads!

The low mileage and the stately character of the car are reflected in its presentation. The Condor Blue paint looks great and is accentuated by a quilted landau roof that boldly matches more of the material on the door leaves. Full hubcaps and whitewall tires—which are fine to ride after Labor Day, by the way—offer even more luxury trim. The overall condition of the car is quite remarkable as, like the painting of the Golden Gate bridge, it does wash off a bit this size should be a never ending job.

Image for article titled For $38,995, Would You Go Big in This 1970 Custom Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon?

The interior is equally handsome and is wrapped in button-tufted blue leather upholstery with deep-pile carpet underneath and color-matching door panels and dashboard to really tie the knot space together. You get three rows of seats here, with the first two completely three passengers wide for a total of eight seats.

Since this is a Cadillac, there are tons of useful features here, including auto-dimming headlights, power windows, and set-it-and-forget automatic climate control.

Image for article titled For $38,995, Would You Go Big in This 1970 Custom Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon?

For power, this Caddy goes big too. There’s a 472-cubic-inch V8 under the carrier’s launch deck, disguised as a hood, and according to factory brochures of the time, put out 375 horsepower (gross) without breaking a sweat. A column-shift three-speed automatic sends the lazy ponies to the rear wheels, because that’s how it was back then. Speaking of lazy, check out that top radiator hose in the engine bay photos. That looks like some kind of huge snake sleeping just eaten the fattest rat in the world.

Image for article titled For $38,995, Would You Go Big in This 1970 Custom Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon?

It’s clear that ASC didn’t skimp on the details when making this special. This car goes as far as feature the dual action (sideways or fold down) tali gate that was popular in more plebeian chariots of the time. It even has the little step cutout in the bumper!

Image for article titled For $38,995, Would You Go Big in This 1970 Custom Cadillac Fleetwood Wagon?

The title is clean and the asking price is $38,995. That, by the way, is a significant discount on what was asked for the car last fall – and apparently was not received.

It’s up to us to decide if it’s worth its new price or if not, what it should actually go for. What do you think, could this custom Caddy make that much money? Or does this ASC conversion say GTFO?

You decide!

eBay ads from St. Charles, Missouri, or go here when the ad disappears.

H/T to Stan R. for the connection!

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